VPN Passthrough and How It Works

VPN Passthrough is a feature of routers which allows computers on a private network to establish outbound VPNs unhindered. VPN passthrough has nothing to do with inbound VPNs, only outbound ones. The term comes from allowing the VPN traffic to “passthrough” the router. NO ports need opening to enable VPN passthrough, it will automatically work. There are different types of VPNs but the most dominant ones are PPTP VPNs and IPsec VPNs. When a router states it supports VPN passthrough it actually means it supports both these types of VPNs. To be exact VPN passthrough is just the combination of PPTP passthrough and IPsec passthrough. This is important as you will see next because PPTP passthrough is handled differently to IPsec Passthrough.

By |2020-02-02T18:16:23+10:00September 28th, 2014|Categories: TCP/IP|Tags: , , , , , , , |1 Comment

The Routing Table

Welcome to part 2 in a 3 part series of articles about routers and routing . If you have arrived here directly through a search engine you may wish to read Part 1 – How Does a Router Work? first. Here we are going to look at the routing table. All network devices that use the TCP/IP protocol have a routing table, even your Windows PC has one. ALL devices use their routing table to determine where to send packets. Without a routing table your PC wouldn’t even be able to communicate with computers on the same subnet. Here is a screenshot of the routing table of my PC. To see your own routing table open a command prompt by typing CMD in the run or search box. Then at the command prompt type “”route print” and press enter.

By |2020-02-02T18:16:23+10:00August 24th, 2011|Categories: TCP/IP|Tags: , , , , |6 Comments

How A Router Works (and IP routing)

Welcome to part 1 in a 3 part series of articles about routers and routing. In part 1 we will cover how routers works, part 2 talks about the routing table and part 3 covers IP routing. So, how does a router work? Well, before we get into that you should know the basics of what the IP address is, subnet mask and default gateway before continuing. If you don’t have a read of networking basics first.

By |2020-02-07T16:34:12+10:00July 18th, 2011|Categories: TCP/IP|Tags: , , , |8 Comments